Christmas Craft Day

All our efforts making jam, marmalade and Christmas mince meat, plus crocheted items and Christmas wreaths were on sale at the Methodist church in Newport today.
After a slow start, we sold quite a few of our efforts, and we’re pleased with the profit made.


The items left over will be sold at the next WI meeting on 12th December.
Thanks must go to all the ladies who came to help selling our goods, and not forgetting Sue Fox’s husband Rodney for putting together the tables and selling frame.

Ann and Linda

Craft Day

We all had a great day at the Methodist church,on our planed craft day. We all met at 9.30am to start making fresh holly wreaths for Christmas. Cheryl Howell was our demonstrator with expert advice on how to assemble an attractive wreath. As you can see by the photographs, she was good at her job.
Next was the turn of Susan Moore and Kimberley Goodall to demonstrate crocheting, and with lots of encouragement we managed to start the chain to enable us to crochet a table decoration in the shape of a Christmas tree. It was great fun, with lots of laughs as half of the group had never used a crouching hook.
Again some of us finished the task, others took them home to finish them at leisure.


It was a super day with all of us enjoying other members company. Photos prove we did make some Christmas trees.
In the kitchen ladies were preparing vegetables for tomorrow’s Christmas lunch at the Methodist church. Twenty of us have booked the meal and the smell coming from the kitchen of the prepared food was delightful and we all looking forward to tomorrow’s meal.
Thanks for attending a super day ladies, look forward to more in the future.
Ann and Linda

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Ramble – 19 September 2018

Five Creekside members travelled over to the bottom of Rew Street in Gurnard. Originally, Coastal Footpath CS16 followed the clifftop from the junction of Rew Street and Marsh Road but due to a landslip a few years ago, this section of the path was closed. However, a kindly landowner had agreed for a permissive path to cross a field from a bit further up Rew Street and join the Coastal Footpath a little further along. We followed this permissive path, joined the Coastal Footpath and started to make our way towards Thorness Bay. En route, we noticed there were the odd section that was getting close to the edge and further landslips may take the path in the near future. We also observed foliage and berries along the way: haws, sloes and we couldn’t resist picking and eating some of the blackberries.

Wendy recalled some old railway carriages that had been converted into residential properties and was asking Rio if she knew where they were. Rio said that they were further along, closer to Thorness and to the north of Sticelett Farm. Wendy thought that there were others before those but Rio didn’t know about these as she doesn’t walk this path very often. We did come to the converted carriages near Thorness and we admired their gardens as well as the décor of the carriages themselves.

Wendy wanted to find a particular flower, galega, so we scouted around a bit for this. We did find it and after doing so, we made our way over stiles and across a couple of fields up to Sticelett Farm on footpath CB1. To Rio’s relief, the cattle were elsewhere and we paused to admire the view at the top of the upper field, before the path went between hedgerows. We crossed over the track that goes into Sticelett Farm, continued on ahead to the top end of Rew Street on footpath CS3.

From the Hillis Corner end of Rew Street, we made our way along the lane back to the cars at the Gurnard end. En route, Rio paused to look at the roadside pond about halfway along. A bit further along, a wood carving of an owl was observed in a garden. Rio later plotted the route on Tracklogs and found it to be 3.6 miles.

Wendy, Elizabeth, Mary and Margaret had lunch at Wootton Methodist Church hall afterwards. Rio went home.

July’s ramble

Mary had requested that the walk be postponed until the fourth Wednesday. It was therefore arranged that we’d meet in the usual place on 25 July. However, the walk was cancelled due to the excessive heat.

Report by Rio Bellgore-Gullit

20th June Ramble

Kathy Barter, from East Cowes, joined four members of Creekside WI: Wendy, Elizabeth, Mary and Rio, at Brannon Way car park. Wendy then drove us to Seaview to join members from other WI’s around the island for the annual communal ramble or amble, led by members of Seaview WI. Mary and Kathy went on the amble. Wendy, Elizabeth and Rio did the ramble, led by Christine and back marked by Beth. There were 14 on the coastal ramble that had to fit in with the tide times.

From Seaview car park, Christine led us down Pier Road and on to the beach. We paused for a photo shoot before making our way along the beach to Seagrove Bay. We then skirted the rocky Horestone Point to Priory Bay beach. The remains of a fallen tree provided a backdrop for another photo shoot. On the beach, we observed some horse riders from the riding school at Nodes Point. There was also a lady with two dogs enjoying a paddle. Engaged in her nature diary, Rio observed cockle, limpet and barnacle shells.

Once around Nodes Point, we had a break by the remains of St Nicholas Church. Christine had walked the route out and found that the Coastal Footpath was very overgrown between Duver Road and the fields so permission was obtained to walk up through the holiday park. We then joined the Coastal Footpath, passing the entrance to Priory Bay Hotel, the telecommunications mast that is disguised as a tree, the cork oak tree near Seagrove Bay and some modern architecture. We got back to Seaview a bit early so Christine took us on a loop down to the Old Fort, along by the sailing club and back up to St Peter’s Church hall.

A team of volunteers from Seaview WI had put together a very good spread. There was a choice of cheese or pate ploughmans that could be topped up with various extras from bowls on the table: coleslaw, onion, peppers, cherry tomatoes to name but a few. We then enjoyed two helpings from a choice of various sweets and this was followed by tea or coffee. It was then time for the raffle draw before we all departed.

Report by Rio Bellgore-Gullit

Book Club

Human Traces – Sebastian Faulks

Human Traces begins in 1876 when we are introduced to the two central characters as teenagers.  Jacques Rebiere is the son of a Breton forester and dreams of acquiring an education to cure his older brother Olivier who is a madman and is kept in the stables shackled to a wall.

Thomas Midwinter is a young Englishman who has a lifelong ambition to work “with the mind”.  They meet in France – both medical students and become lifelong friends pledging to work together to unearth the workings of the mind.  

The story spans several decades and continents and describes the evolving world of physiology and how patients are treated according to their social standing and symptoms. 

Human Traces scored 8.75

Report by Claire Lampough

Ramble – 16th May

Report by Rio Bellgore-Gullit

Five of us made our way over to the Old Smithy car park at Godshill. Before setting off, we were deciding whether to have lunch at the Old Smithy cafe or The Griffin. We popped into the Old Smithy to look at their menu. We decided that we preferred The Griffin. Because Wednesday is a carvery day at The Griffin, it’s prone to getting very busy so we booked our table before doing the walk.

We walked up to Beech Wood from behind The Griffin. Here, we admired the bluebells and Pam took our photo:

We paused to look at the animals on the south side of Godshill Park Farm before plodding up GL44 to Freemantle Gate, formerly an entrance to the Appuldurcombe Estate. Pam took another photo, ‘Why are Creekside WI members behind bars – what have they been up to?’

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April Ramble

Ramble – 18 April 2018

The ramble started from Brannon Way car park in Wootton. Six of us made our way down Wootton High Street, across the bridge overlooking the creek, and then up Kite Hill to Ashlake Copse, where we turned off on the left. We followed the footpath through the copse to Fishbourne Lane. Marlene wasn’t on the walk but it was her birthday the next day so there was a pause to deliver a card to her. We then continued on the coastal footpath to Quarr.

At Quarr, we admired the pigs and it was remarked upon that there were no piglets at the moment. In the next enclosure, a randy boar must have overheard what had been said and thought he’d better get on and make some more!! We then made our way through the Abbey’s grounds to their cafe. Wendy, Margaret, Esme and Mary stopped for refreshments and the weather was decent enough for them to sit outside. During this time, Elizabeth and Rio went to the squirrel hide, situated in a woodland area. Although no squirrels were seen on this occasion, pleasant and tranquil birdsong was enjoyed before they made their way back to rejoin the others.

The group rejoined the coastal footpath and followed it as far as Binstead Church. Here, the group started to disband with Margaret, Elizabeth and Rio making their way to The Fleming Arms for lunch. Wendy, Mary and Esme continued walking. Rio found out at Out To Lunch that Wendy and Mary continued as far as the footpath that crosses Ryde Golf Course to Brookfield Gardens. Esme continued further still, presumedly to Ryde as she lives there.

Report by Rio Bellgore-Gullit

Creekside WI versus Seaview WI

Creekside WI are at it again, Kurling with a visiting WI that is! Seaview WI came to Creekside WI for a ‘ fun’ kurling competition. During a delicious supper, cooked by Jenny Gaches with help from members of the committee, the ladies spent time getting to know each other. Then kurling stones to the ready! Seaview members had a quick try out to test their skills then the two opponents dug deep, cheering winning points scored. Thanks were given by our President Ann Parker, to everyone who contributed to make it a very enjoyable evening.

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Ramble November 2017

Report by Rio Bellgore-GullitThe ramble started from a small car park off of Lynch Lane, in the Gotten Leaze area of Calbourne. Four of us made our way up a bridleway that, after a short distance, went to the right into a field of sheep. We ignored this turning and continued on what was now a Forestry Commission path. This path is used by Forestry Commission vehicles and became quite muddy as a result. We, therefore, climbed up through the colourful autumnal trees on our left and then meandered between these trees of Brighstone Forest up on to Newbarn Down. We eventually came down and joined a path but we were unsure if this was our original path or a different one. We followed this long and winding path up until we reached a multiple junction. Rio recognised the bridleway on the right as being the bridleway that descends to that field of sheep and could see the sheep in the field ahead. The time was getting on and we all fancied a change of scenery, as well as getting hungry for our lunch. We followed this bridleway down through the forest and on through the field of sheep. There were quite a number of black sheep in with the white, about half and half at a guess. We commented that is was unusual to see so many. We’d walked about 2¼ miles and back at the car, Wendy drove us back up Lynch Lane to The Sun Inn, where we all enjoyed our lunch.

Read moreRamble November 2017