Creekside WI On Line Bookclub

Well done ladies…conquering tech problems to meet again to discuss ‘Shabanu, Daughter of the Wind’. The general opinion was that it is a well written book, well researched, with very good descriptions of what it was like to live travelling through the dessert. We discussed cultural traditions and women’s’ choices. Do men have choices? Where does that Meeting time go? Suddenly it was time to score the book and decide on the next one. Scoring with fingers this time ladies! Note the concentration. There is always some time to have a quick catch up and make sure everyone is ok. Meeting in a garden next time?

Creekside WI Online Bookclub

Creekside Online Bookclub met again this month to discuss Water for Elephants By Sara Gruen.

Members agreed that it is a very well written book with excellent descriptions that carry the reader back to the era in which it is set. Characters are clearly described and believable. It was scored above 6 by all members. As ever we enjoyed some lively chat before we overshot our time and Zoom cut us off rather abruptly. Thanks everybody for a great evening….see you next month.

Shabanu Daughter of the Wind by Suzanne Fisher Staples sounds as if it’s going to be exciting.

Book Club Report

You can’t keep a good WI down!
Creekside WI Bookclub is now on line. Last night six of of us zoomed to discuss
the House at Riverton by Kate Moreton. It was very exciting as each member joined;
Well it was our first on line meeting! We did have quite a short discussion because we were also interested in how we were all coping with lockdown. We all enjoyed the book, which was a reminder of Downton Abbey and thought it was a well written book
with interesting and loveable characters. Well done ladies!

Creekside WI Bookclub

It was a great night tonight girls- thanks for coming! Everybody really enjoyed The Gustav Sonata by Rose Tremain, which was about the different strands of love that can be found in life. An easy read with characters that we could all identify with. A book you could pick up and put down and still feel involved in. It scored an average of nine.

Coffee anyone? How many teas? Cake, biscuits and a good old chat – lovely way to top off the evening.

Book Club Meeting November

Eight of us gathered at a members home to discuss our latest read “Any Human Heart” by William Boyd. There were mixed reviews and some of us didn’t persevere with it and didn’t finish reading it. It was written in a diary format about a fictional character Mountstuart a writer in 20th century. The book scored a 9 out of 10 rating.

We enjoyed the usual chat (not book related) along with the obligatory cake & coffee.

We will meet again in January to discuss “Persuasion” by Jane Austin.

Book Club – December

A Cat, a Hat and a Piece of string, by Joanne Harris.

A selection of short stories some of which link together.

The groups favourites included, ‘Would you like to reconnect?’ that involves a mother , loss and the internet. ‘The Game’ – that gets you hooked! The adventures of Faith and Hope, two lively and young at heart residents of Meadowbank Nursing Home are told in a selection of heartwarming stories exploring friendship, the care profession and trust.
Cookie was a particularly strange story mixing food and a need of wanting.

Average score 6.

Report by Claire Lamplough

Creekside WI Bookclub Report

Last Bus to Coffeeville by J Paul Hendersen

A road trip tale in which Nancy Skidmore, who has Alzheimers is rescued by her friend Eugene Chaney lll, from the care home in which she has been placed. He fulfils the promise he made years before to help her die before her condition becomes unmanageable. This involves a road trip with a collection of different characters. Thoughts about this book were fairly unanimous. It was a ‘wordy’ read that at first didn’t seem to be going anywhere but as the story developed and the characters were drawn together, it improved. There were funny parts and a good build up of tension. Relationships and characters were described in minute detail but name changes caused confusion. It provided a window into the fear in which black people lived in the southern states, the intrigue involved in trying remain invisible from the CIA and the downward spiral of living with Alzheimers. Scoring the book was surprisingly varied, from four to eight out of ten. Tea and biscuits anyone?

Book Club – Review

This month we read I Can’t Begin to Tell You, by Elizabeth Buchan. 

The novel by Elizabeth Buchan, an American author is about the resistance movement in Denmark during the Second World War.
The owner of a large estate, Bror, collaborated with the German occupation to protect his family and estate. His English wife, Kay feels her country needs her support when the resistance movement contacts her for help and in spite of concerns for the safety of her son and daughter gives shelter to the resistance on the run from the enemy.

The story is well written and well researched especially the secret communication section in Britain. You realise how the agents and the women taking and receiving the morse code messages had a special relationship with each other and how the loss of an agent affected them.

There was tension in the story and a very dramatic and surprising ending. I would have liked to have known more about what happened next.

The group as a whole enjoyed reading this book and gave it a mark of 7.5 out of 10.

Report by Sylvia Burrows